Archive for Video

WATCH: Dennis Miller On The Zimmerman Verdict, Snowden And Obamacare

“They didn’t exactly do a cracker jack job,” he said of the prosecutor’s performance at the trial.

75% of American Samoans are obese

Samoa Air, the tiny local airliner in American Samoa, sparked a controversy by charging passengers by their weight. Since then it’s helped change the look of an island with the world’s highest obesity rate. Ben Tracy reports.

A study by Brown University in the US found American Samoan babies had excessive weight when born and continued to gain weight repidly after birth.

At 15 months, 38.6 percent of formula-fed boys were obese while only 23.4 percent of breast-fed boys were obese.

Co-author of a report on the study is Dr Nicola Hawley, a research fellow in the Alpert Medical School at Brown University and the Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center.

VIDEO: Man found guilty commits suicide in courtroom

Convicted of statutory sodomy, death sounded like a better alternative…

Steve Parsons was standing trial last week charged with the sexual assault of a 14-year-old girl. When the jury came back with a guilty verdict, authorities say White made a shocking decision with a room full of witnesses.

After a three-day trial and less than six hours of deliberations– 48-year-old Steve Parsons sat in front of a jury of his peers and was found not guilty of forcible sodomy, but guilty of statutory sodomy.

“As the judge was polling the jury, Mr. Parson’s stood up, walked to where I was seated and looked at me and said, ‘I’m going to throw up,’” said Nodaway County Sheriff Darren White, who was seated in the courtroom just feet from Parsons.

“He picked up a drink, took a very small drink out of this cup and then returned to his seat,” White explained.

White says the well-known business owner looked a little off.

In June of 2012, an Arizona man also committed suicide by poison in the courtroom after finding out he was found guilty.

Marin, 53, had fashioned a larger-than-life persona. Tall and distinguished, he had a law degree from Yale University and had scaled Mount Everest. He flew planes and wrote books. He owned a mansion full of fine art in the ritzy Biltmore Estates neighborhood of Phoenix. He had amassed a small fortune — and lost it.

His mansion caught fire in July 2009. Marin said he barely escaped by climbing down a rope ladder from the second floor while wearing a scuba tank and diving mask to protect him from smoke inhalation.

But inside, arson investigators found boxes of flammable debris laid end-to-end through the house from the four ignition points, as if to feed the blaze. Marin was charged with arson of an occupied structure.

“Michael Marin couldn’t pay his mortgage, so he burned down his house,” Deputy Maricopa County Attorney Chris Rapp said in opening statements of the trial on May 21.

Rapp laid bare Marin’s dire financial straits. In the year before the fire, his bank account shrank from $900,000 to just $50. He had a monthly mortgage of $17,250 on the mansion with a balloon payment of $2.3million coming due. In addition, Marin paid another $2,500 per month on a more modest home in Gilbert — where Rapp said he actually lived — and had an overdue tax bill of more than $34,000.

Marin tried to set up a raffle to pay off the loan, but it was deemed illegal by law enforcement and shut down. Then the house burned.

On Thursday, the jury reached a verdict, and Marin and his attorneys were summoned to the courtroom of Judge Bruce Cohen for a 12:30 p.m. hearing.

Read more about the case and surrounding circumstances of the death @ AZ Central.

VIDEO: Should You Go to Jail for Unlocking Your Phone?

“Who owns your phone at the end of the day?” asks Derek Khanna, a visiting fellow at Yale Law and former staff member at the Republican Study Committee.

Last fall, Khanna earned notoriety – and a pink slip – for a public memo urging GOP members of Congress to rethink their stance on copyright law.

More recently, in a column for The Atlantic, Khanna blasted a new ruling that criminalizes the unlocking of cellphones under the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA). Unlocking the phone simply means that a person could use a phone designed for one carrier on another carrier, assuming they had switched his plan. In addition to civil penalties, breaking this law could land you in prison for up to five years and force you to pay a fine of up to $500,000.

“In 1998 a poorly written statute, the DMCA, was passed and it prohibited a wide swath of commonly used technology in the name of defending copyright,” Khanna explains. “If this is allowed to stand, then the answer is you don’t own your phone.”

A White House petition to change the law recently reached the 100,000 signature threshold, which means the Obama administration will have to give an opinion on the matter.

Khanna sat down with Reason’s Nick Gillespie to discuss the unlocking your cellphone, the flaws in the DMCA, and why he was fired from the Republican Study Committee after writing a paper condemning current copyright law.

VIDEO: How Patent Trolls Kill Innovation

“My statement to someone that is the victim of a patent troll lawsuit is that you are completely screwed,” says Austin Meyer, who is himself the target of a so-called “patent troll” lawsuit.

Meyer is a software developer and aviation enthusiast. His two passions intersected in the ’90s when he created a flight simulator called X-Plane, which quickly grew in popularity, outlasting even the once-popular Microsoft Flight Simulator. As many software developers do, Meyer made his application available on mobile devices like the iPhone and Android. And this is where he first ran into trouble.

A company called Uniloc has sued Meyer for patent infringement over a patent called, “System and Method for Preventing Unauthorized Access to Electronic Data.” When a computer runs a paid application, one way that developers can assure that a customer has actually purchased the application is by coding the application to match a license code with an encrypted database. This is a method that most paid applications on the Android market use. It’s a method that Meyer argues has been in use since at least the late ’80s. This is the idea that Uniloc claims to own.

“A patent troll is a company, a person… who owns patents, but doesn’t make anything or sell anything,” says Julie Samuels, an attorney and the Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Samuels says that patent trolls are a huge tax on innovation and add nothing valuable to the marketplace. A study out of Boston University estimates the direct economic damage that patent trolls cause to be around $29 billion a year, and this doesn’t account for hush-hush, off-the-record settlements. But the bigger problem, says Samuels, is the patent system itself.

“You can’t separate the problem with the patent troll from the problem with software patents,” says Samuels. “There are hundreds of thousands of software patents floating around that are really broad, that are really vague … and a lot of them are bought up by patent trolls.”

A Yale study found that the U.S. patent office is approving new software patents at an approximate rate of 40,000 a year. That’s more than 100 new software patents every day. Tracking every software patent to make sure one is not in violation would be an utter impossibility without a full-time team of lawyers on staff.

Uniloc, which purchased the patent in question at a bankruptcy proceeding, declined an interview request for this piece. But on their website, they brag about a victory over software giant Microsoft resulting in $388 million in damages (though this amount was later lowered in an appeals court). Despite the enormous risk, and the enormous cost just to defend against a patent suit, Meyer is resolved to do so.

“I will not simply give somebody money that endorses the idea that they should sue people for doing something amazing,” says Meyer. “It must be stopped at some point.”

About 6 minutes.

Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Shot by Amanda Winkler, Tracy Oppenheimer, and Weissmueller. Music by Case Newsom, Broke for Free, and Pionir.

Visit Reason TV for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason TV’s YouTube channel to receive automatic updates when new material goes live.

Monster Energy Drink Linked to Five Deaths, FDA Investigates


The Food and Drug Administration is investigating five deaths and one non-fatal heart attack that may have been caused by Monster Energy Drink, a highly caffeinated beverage.

According to the reports being analyzed, people have had adverse reactions after consuming the popular drink, which contains 240 milligrams of caffeine – seven times the amount of caffeine found in a 12-ounce cola. The drink is packaged in a 24-ounce can.

Further: Are Energy Drinks Dangerous for Kids?


Windows 8 Puts Microsoft Back in Game


Tech blogger Robert Scoble on the latest products from the tech giant. Previously FBN’s Shibani Joshi commented on Microsoft’s unveiling of Windows 8 at its developer’s conference.


VIDEO: Tracking the Obama Administrations changing narrative on the Benghazi attacks

Charles Krauthammer weighs in on the Obama administrations response to the attacks in Benghazi, stating that President Obama is contradicting himself:


What did President Obama know, and when did he know it? Brett Baier tracked the Whitehouse’s changing narrative on the story:


Sources in Libya say a request made by CIA operators on the ground for military back-up during the Sept. 11 attack at the U.S. Consulate was denied, Fox News reports:

Fox News has learned from sources who were on the ground in Benghazi that an urgent request from the CIA annex for military back-up during the attack on the U.S. Consulate and subsequent attack several hours later was denied by officials in the CIA chain of command — who also told the CIA operators twice to “stand down” rather than help the ambassador’s team when shots were heard at approximately 9:40 p.m. in Benghazi on Sept. 11.

Former Navy SEALs Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty were part of a small team who were at the CIA annex about a mile from the U.S. Consulate where Ambassador Chris Stevens and his team came under attack. When they heard the shots fired, they radioed to inform their higher-ups to tell them what they were hearing and requested permission to go to the consulate and help out. They were told to “stand down,” according to sources familiar with the exchange. An hour later, they called again to headquarters and were again told to “stand down.”

VIDEO: Ann Romney on Womens Rights. Ann Coulter on the Women Vote

Ann Romney talks to the ladies on The View about some of the issues surrounding women’s rights:

Mugged” author Ann Coulter on the Presidential candidates’ efforts to gain support of women voters:


VIDEO: Best moments from presidential debates

Ahead of the first presidential debate between Pres. Obama and Mitt Romney, Anderson Cooper recaps some of the most unforgettable debate moments in U.S. history.

After the debate, the now famous Taiwan news animations described the event:

Obama Romney presidential debate 2012: The first of three matchups between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney was held in Colorado last night. Romney handily trounced his opponent on the issues of jobs, the economy and taxes. To Obama’s Democratic supporters, it looked as thought the president didn’t even want to be there.

Moderator Jim Lehrer struggled to do his job. Romney said he would cut subsidies to PBS, though he said he liked Big Bird and liked Jim Lehrer, too.