Engadget breaks down the ruling:

Apple brought three utility and four design patents to bear against Samsung. Patent number 7,469,381 is for the bounce back that occurs when you scroll beyond the edge of a webpage or document in iOS. Patent number 7,844,915 is for single-finger scrolling and two-finger zooming, while number 7,864,163 claims tap-to-zoom technology. As for the design patents, D618,677 claims the iPhone’s edge-to-edge glass, speaker slot and display border, while D593,087 claims its rounded corners and home button, andD604,305 claims the grid-style icon layout in iOS. The last design patent, D504,889 is for the iPad’s edge-to-edge glass, rounded corners, and thin bezel.

Apple hit a home run with the ‘381 bounce-back patent — the jurors found that all 21 Samsung devices at issue infringed and that Samsung Korea induced its subsidiaries to sell those infringing devices as well. As for the the ‘915 and ‘163 zooming and scrolling patents, team Cupertino was also successful, albeit not completely: the jury found that most, but not all of the devices infringed and that Samsung Korea was, once again, guilty of inducement. Apple enjoyed similar success with its design patents, with the jury finding that every Samsung phone at issue infringed the D’305 iOS icon grid patent. Meanwhile, the D’677 edge-to-edge glass patent was infringed upon by every handset except for the Galaxy Ace, and the D’087 rounded corners patent was infringed by the Galaxy S, Galaxy S 4G, and the Vibrant. The D’889 patent turned out to be Apple’s sole loser, as the jury found that the Galaxy Tab 10.1 WiFi and 4G LTE didn’t infringe the iPad’s design. To top things off, the jury found that all of the infringement was willful except for the infringement of the D’087 patent, and that all of Apple’s patents are valid.

The Verge has an easy and useful itemized product breakdown: